Fuel Cell EVs

Using hydrogen gas as a fuel for generating electric power, FCEVs produce zero harmful tailpipe emissions. In fact, because they include a fine air filter, they purify the air as they go (an FCEV removes the particulate pollution from ~four conventional vehicles).

The world’s leading manufacturers have been developing hydrogen FCEVs over the past 20 years so that vehicles on the road today will go as far as a petrol or diesel vehicle on a full tank of hydrogen, can refuel from empty in three to five minutes and will provide a quiet, smooth drive.

https://fuelcellsworks.com/news/hyundai-spains-new-campaign-to-showcase-nexo-fuel-cell-technology/

How an FCEV works

An FCEV uses hydrogen gas as a fuel, stored under pressure in a compact, strong but lightweight tank. At the heart of an FCEV is a fuel cell system which includes the fuel cell stack. The fuel cell stack is a layered arrangement of many individual fuel cells. The hydrogen and ambient air (containing oxygen) are fed respectively into the anode (negative) and cathode (positive). At the anode, the hydrogen molecules release electrons, which travel to the cathode, creating an electrical current.

The hydrogen ions, created when the electrons are released, travel by a different route to the cathode, where they combine with oxygen and the released electrons to form water.

In an FCEV, the power generated by the fuel cell stack is used to drive the FCEV‘s electric motor, with additional power supplied when needed from a hybrid battery. This battery is also used to store additional short-term energy generated in FCEVs equipped with regenerative braking.

Fuel cell electric technology explained

https://www.toyota.co.uk/world-of-toyota/environment/fuel-cell-vehicle

A plentiful source of cleaner energy

Hundreds of FCEVs are currently operating in the UK, providing safe, clean and sustainable transport, in a variety of end-use applications.

The benefits of FCEVs

Environmental

Hydrogen for FCEVs can be produced from ultra-low carbon sources like electrolysis from renewable energy, biomass gasification and fossil fuel reformation including carbon capture and storage. Hydrogen production by electrolysis can help to balance the electricity grid and allow for more integration of renewables into the national energy mix. Fuel cells produce no CO2 or other harmful emissions, the only by-product of their operation is water vapour, through the bonding of hydrogen ions and oxygen.

This means widespread deployment of hydrogen fuel cell vehicles helps to solve the problem of poor quality air in our cities and the need to remove carbon emissions from our transport systems.

To support the introduction of hydrogen as a transport fuel by developing and implementing a strategy that will help to decarbonise road transport, create economic growth, diversify energy supply and improve local environments.

To support the introduction of hydrogen as a transport fuel by developing and implementing a strategy that will help to decarbonise road transport, create economic growth, diversify energy supply and improve local environments.

Learn more about fuel cell vehicle projects