UK H2Mobility

UK H2Mobility shows that by 2030 the total CO2 emissions associated with a Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle (FCEV) can be 75% less than those for equivalent diesel vehicles, and with a clear pathway to zero carbon by 2050.

The total annual CO2 abatement implied is 3m tonnes in 2030, based on the volume of vehicle uptake calculated in the roadmap. The DECC 2050 Pathway analysis presents scenarios in which FCEVs make up between 20% (7m vehicles) and 50% (17m vehicles) of the UK’s total vehicle fleet. UK H2Mobility’s analysis indicates the UK is on the right course to meet these projections.

Figure 6: Annual CO₂ abatement from the UK H₂Mobility roadmap (to 2030) and DECC Pathway Scenarios (2030-2050). © UK H₂Mobility Project
Figure 6: Annual CO2 abatement from the UK H2Mobility roadmap (to 2030) and DECC Pathway Scenarios (2030-2050). © UK H2Mobility Project

Using Air Quality Damage Cost Guidance from Defra (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs), it is possible to quantify the benefit of replacing diesel vehicles, which emit oxides of nitrogen (NOx) and particulate matter (PM), with FCEVs emitting only water vapour. The cost saving that accrues from reduced damage to human health and the environment is £100m – £200m annually by 2050 (depending on the rate of growth of FCEVs in the total fleet after 2030).

The hydrogen production mix in the UK H2Mobility roadmap shows a further benefit of FCEVs: a greater proportion of the UK’s road fuel (measured both by financial value and energy content) would be made in the UK. This is because more of the process inputs are locally produced and because the economics of hydrogen production and distribution favour local production.

Figure 7: Value of increased domestic energy production and reduced imports in 2030. © UK H₂Mobility Project
Figure 7: Value of increased domestic energy production and reduced imports in 2030. © UK H2Mobility Project